Visiting Ichijodani Asakura Clan Ruins -Bhutanese Family in Fukui City, Fukui Prefecture-

Last Update: 2018.08.01
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Mr. Ugyen Dorji's sister and his wife holding their son

I visited Ichijodani Asakura Clan Ruins in Fukui City

with Mr. Ugyen Dorji’s family from Bhutan.

 

Mr. Ugyen Dorji is studying at University of Fukui

as a teacher trainee from Bhutan since around October of 2017.

And the end of March of 2018, his family arrived in Japan as well.

 

 

Beautiful view of Ichijodani Asakura Clan Ruins
Mr.Ugyen Doji's sister is standing under a cherry blossom tree

The Ichijodani Asakura Clan Ruins is surrounded by beautiful nature,

so the visitors can enjoy the great view, and learn about the history at the same time.

 

 

Mr. Ugyen Dorji's sister is walking in the starting point of the restored town

There are Japanese samurai warriors’ residences and machiya traditional (merchant’s) houses which were rebuilt with some of the archaeological remains found there.

They were rebuilt to look like the old town.

They felt as if they were in the Warring States Period.

 

 

Mr. Ugyen Dorji's sister and his wife are wearing the Warring State Period's kimono
Mr. Ugyen Dorji's sister and his wife are wearing the Warring State Period's kimono and sitting on the stage outside

In the restored town escape, there is a place where visitors can

try the Warring States Period’s style kimono dressing experience.

 

Mr. Ugyen Dorji’s wife and sister were very excited to wear the kimono

for the first time ever. The kimono which they wore were the ones the women

from the Warring States Period used to wear to special places and/or events.

 

 

Mr. Ugyen Dorji's sister and his wife are wearing the Warring State Period's kimono and walking in the restored town
The Bhutan Museum Fukui's poster girl, Mr. Sonam Choki is standing next to the traditional Bhutanese clothing, Gho and Kira

Left:Gho / Middle:Kira

Right: The poster girl of Bhutan Museum Fukui, Ms. Sonam Choki

 

They said that although the kimono were heavy, they felt grateful to wear them.

They had hard time walking smoothly with the Japanese traditional sandals (zouri).

They also said that the kimono which they wore were similar to traditional Bhutanese clothing for men called “Gho”. For women, the traditional clothing is called “Kira”.

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